ADFE NYC




Health And Nutrition


Deficient sanitation systems, poor nutrition, and inadequate health services have pushed Haiti to the bottom of the World Bank’s rankings of health indicators. According to the United Nations World Food Programme, 80 percent of Haiti’s population lives below the poverty line. Consequently, malnutrition is a significant problem. Half the population can be categorized as “food insecure,” and half of all Haitian children are undersized as a result of malnutrition. Less than half the population has access to clean drinking water, a rate that compares poorly even with other less-developed nations. Haiti’s healthy life expectancy at birth is only 54 years. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that only 43 percent of the target population receives the recommended immunizations.



In terms of health care spending, Haiti ranks last in the western hemisphere. Economic instability has limited any growth in this area. Per capita, Haiti spends about US$83 annually on health care. There are 25 physicians and 11 nurses per 100,000 population. Only one-fourth of births are attended by a skilled health professional. Most rural areas have no access to health care, making residents susceptible to otherwise treatable diseases. In 2003, for example, the WHO confirmed an outbreak of typhoid fever in Haiti that, because of a lack of access to doctors and safe water, led to dozens of deaths.



Malnutrition and hunger are not new to Haiti, But the ADFE Offers Hope.
we plan a ground up approach to reduce food insecurity, integrating three strategies:
•Improving agricultural and off-farm livelihoods
•Enhancing mother and child health and nutrition
•Developing an early warning system for food-security-related crises & increased emergency preparedness.
•making nutrition a sustainable business for the wellness of future generations.


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